Maritime inquiry 1939 - 1945

The information below regarding ships in the Nortraship fleet is a direct transcript of the original source "Sjøforklaringer fra andre verdenskrig (1940 - 1945)". The informasjon is collected from maritime inquiries held during and right after the war. The information may differ from the other quality assured information in Krigsseilerregisteret.

Date
August 23, 1941
Location
Off Butt of Lewis
Cause
Torpedert [av tysk ubåt]
Cargo
Kull og koks
Route
Milford Haven - Reykjavik
Crew list
Komplett
Survived
14
Captured
0
Deceased
9 [9]
Missing
0
  • Abstract

    Date
    September 2, 1941
    Location
    Glasgow
    Administrator
    Konsul Offerdahl

    ...

    Appeared the vessel's master, Jørgen Gerd Jørgensen, and produced a written report, prepared by him, with reference to the occurence ...

    ...

    The captain referred to the report as his evidence and added that he was on the bridge when the torpedoing took place together with the chief officer, Edgar Sørensen, the look-out man, A.B. Seaman Jørgen Hiedling, and the helmsman, deck boy Alfred Hall. Thew two last mentioned have left here, but the captain is of opinion that their presence at the Maritime Inquiri is not necessary. The order, which the captain received about returning, he got verbally, first from one of the escorting trawlers and later from one of the destroyers. The order was shouted through a megaphone at short distance and was quite plain so that there could be no reason for misunderstanding. Two other vessels, one English and one Belgian, received the same order, and they proceeded back quite near to each other. One of the escorting trawlers was about half a mile ahead of the "Inger" and the other one was on the port side so far away that she could not be seen. In spite of enquiries made, the captain has since not obtained any explaination why the vessel was to return. It was quite dark when the torpeoing took place and all lights on board were darkened. All the ship's papers, among which were the secret convoy insstructions which were lying in a canvas bag weighted with iron, went down with the ship. The vessel was equipped with six machine guns, but everything passed so quickly that there was no opportunity of using them. The captain is quite certain that the 9 missing men lost their lives.

    After the torpedoing had taken place we did not see anything of the two other vessels or the escorting trawlers. It was a fishing trawler which picked up those who were saved.

    ...

    The 1st witness (Edgar Sørensen, chief officer) stated that he was aware of the contents of the captin's report and referred to that as his evidence. He was on the bridge when the torpedoing took place and had been on watch there since 19.00 o'clock. During that time he had seen no submarine. The witness also heard the order which was given that the vessel should return, but he, himself, has formed no opinion about the reason why the order was given. The witness did not see anything of the men who lost their lives. He, himself, managed to get into the starboard lifeboat which had become unhooked from the tackle and was lying by the bilge keel. Otherwise, the witness made statement in accordance with the captain.

    ...

    Appeared the 2nd witness (Oluf Olsen, 2nd engineer) who stated that he was in the steward's cabin when the torpedoing took place. The wireless operator and the steward were alos there. All three of them ran out on deck from where they were washed over board. They were taken into the lifeboat shortly afterwards. The witness did not see anything of those who lost their lives.

    Of the engine room staff, the chief engineer was on watch, the 3rd engineer was probably in his cabin, the donkeyman was in the engine room as was also fireman Trygve Larsen.

    ...