Sjøforklaring 1940 - 1945

Informasjonen nedenfor er direkte avskrift av orginalkilden "Sjøforklaringer fra andre verdenskrig (1940 - 1945). Informasjonen her er fra sjøforklaringer holdt under og rett etter krigen og kan derfor avvike noe fra den øvrige kvalitetssikrede informasjonen i Krigsseilerregisteret.

Dato
19. oktober 1940
Posisjon
N 57 55' , ca. 25 gr. Vest
Årsak
Torpedert [av tysk ubåt]
Last
Ballast
Reiserute
Manchester - Montreal
Mannskapsliste
Komplett
Reddet
30
Fanget
0
Omkommet
2 [2]
Savnet
0
  • Referat

    Dato
    6. november 1940
    Sted
    Glasgow
    Administrator
    Konsul Wm. A. Gillespie

    ...

    Captain Haakon Martinsen appeared ... In the absence of logbooks no extracts had been prepared, and Captain instead handed in a full report which he had made ready. In addition he mentioned that he did not see the submarine, or the track of the torpedo. He did not see the ship sink. As she was in very deep water he was satisfied the ship did not hit a mine but was sunk by torpedo attack. To the numbered questions he replied as follows:-

    (1) By torpedo attack. (2) No. (3) Yes. (4) Boats swung outside of davits and ready for lowering. Last boat exercises 15th October 1940. (5) Ship in ballast. (7) Five hatches. No tonnage openings. (8) None. (9) Last in drydock March 1940. Not been aground since. (10) All belongings lost. (11) By Canadian Destroyer. (13) Torpedo attack.

    ...

    First witness: ... Anton Minsaas, Chief Engineer ... He was on watch 8 to 12 p.m. He had been examining the steering engine and was on his way to the engine room again, when there was a severe explosion. He went to his room and ship began to list. The engines stopped as apparently the steam pipes between the boilers and engines were broken. The engine room was full of steam, which prevented him from going down. In the boiler room there was one fireman and the Donkeyman, and one greaser was in the engine room. Both donkeyman and greaser were not seen again and he was of opinion they were killed by the explosion. He did not see them. The ship was leaking badly, and he and others went into the lifeboat, and were later picked up by a Destroyer. To the numbered questions, he replied as follows:-

    (1) By explosion. (2) No. (3) Yes. (4) On leaving Liverpool. (5) Ship was in ballast. (9) March, 1940. Not been aground since. (10) All belongings lost. (11) Crew saved by lifeboat and then by Destroyer. (12) No. (13) Torpedo attack.

    ...

    Second Witness: Bjarne Engedal ... Third Officer, who stated, he was on watch 8 to 12 p.m. Saqturday, 19th October, at 11.25 p.m. there was a severe explosion which shook the ship. The engines stopped and he ordered the two men on the bridge to No. 1 starboard lifeboat. As soon as sufficient men collected they cut the lashings and lowered the boat into the water. When the men got into the lifeboat they pushed off but kept alongside. One man, Kristiansen, remained aboard with the Captain to get food and clothing. After getting a supply into the boat this man and the Captain came into the boat. They pulled away from the siniking ship but kept her in sight. He saw two ships when he was in the lifeboat and signals by morse lamp were exchanged, but the other steamers did not stop. At daybreak they rowed back to the ship but could not get aboard for fear of damaging lifeboat in the rough sea. They lay near ship the ship on lee side and spoke to the men in their other lifeboat, and it was decided they should try to reach Scotland. Sail was set but if was difficult to keep on a right course owing to the direction of the wind, they sailed all night, and next morning (Monday) a Destroyer was sighted which came up to them and they came aboard. On Wednesday they were safely landed at Gourock. To the numbered questions he replied as follows:-

    (1) By exsplosion of torpedo. (2) No. (3) Yes. (4) Boats in good condition, swiung out ready for lowering, specially supplied with food, clothing, and water. Last Boat drill on leaving Liverpool. (8) Ship not leaking. (9) In Oslo, March 1940. Not been aground since. (10) All effects lost. (11) By lifeboats and Destroyer. (12) No. (13) Explosion by torpedo. (14) When crew were afloat in lifeboats.

    ...

    Third Witness: Olaf Andreassen ... who stated that on 19th October he was on watch in the boiler room from 8 to 12 p.m. He was alone. At 11.25 p.m. there was a violent explosion and he found himself swimming in water and oil. He caught a thin wire, and drew himself up to a grating and up a ladder to the deck. He shouted to the crew asking where a lifeboat was. Roald Kristiansen told him to go into the boat which lay in the water alongside. He dropped from deck into the water and was drawn into the boat. They rowed away from the ship and later came aboard a destroyer, and landed in Scotland. He spoke to the Donkeyman and the Greaser at 11.20 p.m. but did not see them again.

    ...

    Fourth Witness: Roald Kristianssen ... Able Seaman, who stated he was on outlook duty from 10.40 to 12 midnight on 19th October. He heard a violent explosion. He was in the crow´s next, and came down on deck. The ship took a list. He went up to the boat deck and saw the Captain and some others of the crew. He assisted in lowering the lifeboats. The Captain told them to lower boats to the main deck until the men could get into the boats. The boats were then lowered into the waters. He remained on deck with the Captain. He was told to go into the store room to collect food. He got a supply of food and put it aboard a lifeboat. He also picked up some clothes. He lowered the instruments the Captain had collected into the lifeboat. Captain and he then went into a lifeboat. Ultimately they were picked up by a Destroyer and landed in Scotland. Before going into the lifeboat he was told by the Captain to go to the crew´s quarters aft to see that no one was left aboard. To the Assessors´ question no. 15 he replied "No".

    ...