Sjøforklaring 1939 - 1945

Informasjonen nedenfor vedr. skip i Nortraships flåte er direkte avskrift av orginalkilden "Sjøforklaringer fra andre verdenskrig (1940 - 1945)". Informasjonen her er fra sjøforklaringer holdt under og rett etter krigen og kan derfor avvike noe fra den øvrige kvalitetssikrede informasjonen i Krigsseilerregisteret.

Dato
14. mai 1941
Posisjon
55.36 N, 13.24 W
Årsak
Angrepet av fly, bunnventilen trolig slått inn. [tyske fly]
Reiserute
Oban - Curacao
Mannskapsliste
Komplett
Reddet
24
Fanget
0
Omkommet
0 [0]
Savnet
0
  • Referat

    Dato
    27. mai 1941
    Sted
    Glasgow
    Administrator
    Konsul L. Offerdahl
    Merknad
    2 engelske soldater i tillegg til besetningen på 24.

    ...

    Appeared the vessel's master, Gerhard Reichelt, who produced the deck log book and handed in a log extract from same in connection with the occurence. The log extract was compared with the deck log book and found to be in accordance with this.

    ...

    The captain reffered to what had been entered in the log extract and added that he, himself, was in bed at 7.20 o'clock on the 14th May when the chief officer came down and reported that there was an aeroplane over the vessel. At the same time there was a report and it was found that a bomb had been dropped close by on the port side. When he came up he quickly understood that the situation was hopeless as the vessel was heeling heavily over to port. He thereupon went round and made inspection, but found that there was nothing to be done except to get into the boats. The aeroplane did not return. 2 Lewis guns and 2 Hutt-guns had been placed on board with which there was fired without he knowing whether the aeroplane was hit. The guns were served by the two British soldiers and one of the crew (an Englishman). The deck log book, the crew's papers, the tonnage certificate and the accounts were saved. The secret convoy instructions were handed over to the master of the "Zaafaran" against receipt in which it is stated that he has burnt the instructions. The vessel had 3 men in excess of the manning scale, and lifeboats and lifesaving equipment was in the prescribed condition. On the occasion it was fine weather with slight sea, so that the saving of the crew was effected without difficulty. The captain did not himself see that the "Karlander" sank, but heard later from one of the British corvettes, which accompanied the convoy, that the vessel had sunk 3 hours afterwards. Had the vessel been nearer land there might, in the opinion of the captain, have been the question of trying to save her.

    ...

    The 1st witness (chief officer Michael Andersen) stated that he was aware of the contents of the log extract. He added that he was on watch on the bridge from 4-8 o'clock on the 14th May. Probably 2 minutes before the aeroplane came over the vessel, an alert was signalled from the Commodore's vessel. The machine guns were at once made ready and when the aeroplane came over there was fired with them. He saw that the bullets bounced off and fell into the water under the aeroplane. They were on board for about 20 minutes after the bomb had been dropped and the witness declares that there was nothing else to do than to go into the boats. It was only a question of time as to when the vessel was going to sink. There was consequently no question of saving her. The witness added that there were two men on the look-out - one on each side of the bridge. The witness stated that he had heard from several that the vessel sank 3 hours afterwards.

    ...

    The 2nd witness (chief engineer Thomas Hartwig Johansen) stated that he was on deck when the bomb fell about 2 feet away from the ship's side. He at once called the 2nd officer and thereafter he went in on the engine top. The 2nd engineer then came up and together with him the witness went down into the engine room. How extensive the damage was could not be seen, but water was pouring in round about. In the opinion of the witness there was nothing to do but to get into the boats. The witness was once more in on the engine top and then the water had risen to about 1 foot above the bottom of the condenser. Before the witness went in on the engine top for the second time he had called out to the captain, who was standing on the upper engine grating, that there was nothing to be done but to get into the boats. Still another explosion was heard from the engine room before the crew had left the ship. The witness considered it quite hopeless to try to save the vessel.

    ...

    Th 3rd witness (2nd engineer Jacob Arthur Isaksen) stated that hewas on watch in the engine room when the bomb fell. Suddenly water was pouring in from about the bottom valve without the witness being able to say definitely whether it was this which had been knocked in. The witness at once stopped the engine, and then went up in order to find the chief engineer. They then went down together and found that the water was standing 3 feet above the tank top. In the opinion of the witness it was quite hopeless to do anything, so that there was no other way out than to get into the boats.

    ...

    Appeared the 4th witness, Theodor Marius Salvesen ... A.B. Seaman on the "Karlander" ... The witness stated that he was at the wheel at 7.20 o'clock in the morning of the 14th May. He did not see the aeroplane before it came over the ship. At once, it dropped a bomb which fell on the port side in way of the No. 3 hatch. Directly afterwards came another bomb which fell in way of the poop. In the opinion of the witness there was nothing to do but to get into the boats.

    He later heard from the destroyer that the vessel had sunk 3 hours after they had gone into the boats and had got on board the vessel which saved them.

    ...