Sjøforklaring 1939 - 1945

Informasjonen nedenfor vedr. skip i Nortraships flåte er direkte avskrift av orginalkilden "Sjøforklaringer fra andre verdenskrig (1940 - 1945)". Informasjonen her er fra sjøforklaringer holdt under og rett etter krigen og kan derfor avvike noe fra den øvrige kvalitetssikrede informasjonen i Krigsseilerregisteret.

Dato
27. juni 1940
Posisjon
50 12 N og 13 18 V
Årsak
Beskutt og satt i brann [av tysk ubåt]
Last
Standard trelast
Reiserute
Halifax, N.S. - Hull
Mannskapsliste
Komplett
Reddet
28
Fanget
0
Omkommet
1 [1]
Savnet
0
  • Referat

    Dato
    5. juli 1940
    Sted
    Plymouth
    Administrator
    Visekonsul S. Carlile Davis

    ...

    Captain Caspar Bjørset appeared an declared that he was the Master of the motorship "LENDA" ... "The "LENDA" sailed from Halifax on the 15th June last with a cargo of sawn lumber (1929 standard) bound for Hull. On her departure the said ship was in every respect in a good and seaworthy condition. He produced the logbook of the ship and an extract of the same concerning the events that occurred particularly on the 27th June last. ... The master referred to the contents of the extract of the logbook and declared that the voyage across the Atlantic Ocean proceeded without incident until early of the morning of the 27th June last when at about 12.50 a.m. he went on deck and saw a subarine on the starboard quarter distant about 150 feet. After she had come up a little further on the starboard side she turned and went round the stern of the ship to the port side. When she got abreast of the midships she opened fire without any warning. Shells of different sorts struck the said ship. That he immediately ordered the engines to stop and the cfrew to seek shelter some members of the crew managed to get on the outside of the deck cargo on the starboard side. The submarine continued to shell the said ship which began to take a list to starboard; after 20 minutes the bombardment of the ship stopped. That they got away the starboard lifeboat the 2nd Officer being in charge of it, that he and two others put the starboard dingy on the water but it filled at once, it had evidently been splintered by shell-fire. That they then ran to the port lifeboat and put it into the water but it filled owing to the damage it had sistained by shell splinters. If kept afloat by the air tanks which were intact one side. That before they left the said ship 4 other members of the crew got into the boat. By that time the submarine had disappeared. That they went round the bow of the said ship and found the other lifeboat into which they all got. That he then discovered that the Chief Officer Bernhard Forstronen was missing. That at daybreak they returned to the ship and the Master found the Chief Officer lying on the port side of the bridge dead; from his appearance he had evidently been struck by shell splinters. The ship was at that time listing heavily to starboard and burning fircely. That they were able to launch the port dingy and transfer 8 men to the dingy from the lifeboat which was badly overloaded. That they then set sail and taking the dingy in the tow set course for the South of Ireland. The Weather at the time was overcast and there was a heavy Atlantic swell. The wind was blowing from the W.S.W. force of about 3 to 4 freshening. That after sailing for about 12 hours they sighted 2 British destroyers. That when they came up to them they found that they were H.M.S. "Hurricane" and H.M.S. "Havelock". That he and 18 members of the crew were taken on board H.M.S. "Hurricane", tyhe members of the crew in the dingy had previously been picked up by H.M.S. "Havelock". That they were very well treated on board the destroyers in which they were subsequently brought to Plymouth. That those on board the "Hurricane" were landed on Sunday the 30th June and those on the "Havelock" on Tuesday the 2nd July.

    That just after they had finally left the said ship two explosions occurred on her apparently in the engine room and she took a heavier list to starboard but it is believed that she will be kept afloat by her cargo for some time and that it might be possible to salve the ship and a part of the cargo.

    ...

    ... the First Witness the Second Officer Ernhard Myking who deposed that he had made the entries in the logbook relating to the attack on the ship by a submarine and that certain later entries had been made in the logbook by the Captain. He furthermore declared that at midnight of the 26th June he went on watch on the bridge of the "LENDA" which was then in latitude 50 12' N and longitude 13 18' W.

    The weather at the time was moderate. That after he had been on the bridge about 40 minutes he sighted the outline of a submarine at a distance of about a mile. That the submarine then went round the stern of the said ship and came up about 10 minutes later on the starboard side she then turned again and came up on the port side That as soon as he sighted the submarine he sent Ludvigsen who was on the lookout to report the matter to the Captain who immediately came on to the bridge. That no one on board the said submarine hailed the said ship or made any signal but without warning fired on the said ship shells which caused considerable damage. That when the firing started he left the bridge to seek shelter after telegraphing the engine room to stop the engines. That the submarine continued to bombard the said ship for about 20 minutes. That when he left the bridge the Chief Officer Bernhard Forstronen was there with the Captain. That after sheltering some time by the cabin on the lower bridge he ran between two shots to the after deck and sheltered behind the deck cargo on the starboard ship. That when he tried to reach the starboard lifeboat he could not do so as he found that the forepart of the arter deck cargo was on fire. That when he saw the starboard lifeboat leave the ships side he jumped into the water and was picked up by those in that boat. That several other members of the crew jumped into the seaaand were picked up by the same boat. That some time later they met the port lifeboat which was in a leaking condition and took from it the Captain and members of the crew who were in it. That they then found that the Chief Officer was missing. At about that time the submarine disappeared from the scene. That when it was daylight he went on board the said ship and on the port side of the bridge found the Chief Officer the said Bernhard Forstronen lying dead having been killed by shell fire. That at that time the said ship was afire aft and amidships and it was dangerous to remain on the said. That they then left as quickly as possible and that as they came away they heard two big explosions. That they then set sail in the lifeboat and towing another boat in which some of the crew had been placed set a course for Fastnet Rock. That he and the other members of the crew in the lifeboat were picked up at about 3.30 p.m. the same day by H.M.S. Hurricane and brought to Plymouth.

    That he lost all his effects and belongings including some wireless books and his certificates the only document he saved was his Pass-book.

    ...

    The Second Witness Johan Skaaleskog the 3rd Engineer of the "LENDA" appeared an deposed that on June 27th he was on duty in the engine room of the "LENDA" whan at about 12.40 a.m. he heard a shot from a gun and just afterwards he heard something hit the ship. That he received instructions by the telegraph to stop the engines which he did at once. That after he had seen that all the engines were in a safe condition he went up on deck and heard firing with shells striking the ship. That he went for protection behind the casing of the cabins amidships. That then in accordance with orders he proceeded to the starboard lifeboat and helped to launch it. That when the firing by the submarine ceased they went away in the lifeboat and waited until daybreak. That they then returned to the ship and helped to get out a small boat from the portside and he with 7 other members of the crew got into that boat which was towed by the lifeboat when they set sail for land. That at baout 4 p.m. on the same day they were picked up by a British Warship H.M.S. Havelock and brought to Plymouth where they landed on the 2nd day of July instant.

    ...

    The Third Witness Marius Lein then appeared and deposed that he was on the bridge keeping a lookout on the 27th June last when at 12.30 a.m. he saw the outline of a submarine on the port side. That almost at once the submarine began to fire and shells struck the ship causing the deck cargo to catch fire. That at the same time orders were given to stop the engines. He then went to the middle deck and sought shelter from the attack of the submarine. That when the firing from the submarine stopped he helped to put the small boat from the starboard side into the water but it so damaged it could not be used. They then launched the port lifeboat which was also damaged but could float on the tanks on one side whichwere sound. A few of the crew got into that lifeboat but later were transferred to the starboard lifeboat which returned to the ship that they then launched a small boat from the port side. That 8 members of the crew went into that boat which was towed by the lifeboat when they set sail for land. That they continued sailing until about 4 p.m. when they were picked up by H.M.S. Hurricane and brought to Plymouth.

    ...

    The Fourth Witness Leif Ludvigsen then appeared and deposed that he was at the wheel of the motorhsip "LENDA" on the 27th June when at about 12.30 a.m. he saw a submarine on the port side coming towards the ship it then passed under the stern and came up on the starboard side and then went back against to the port side. That no one on board the submarine spoke to them but without warning began to fire at the said ship which was hit several times. That he went down from the bridge on which at that time the Chief Officer was standing. That he does not know what happened to the Chief Officer and he never saw him alive again but that some hours later he saw his dead body lying on the bridge on the port side. That he and several other members of the crew got away from the ship safely in the starboard lifeboat the cargo was burning. That after they had been sailing the lifeboat for many hours they were picked up by the destroyer "Hurricane" and brought to Plymouth.

    ...