Sjøforklaring 1939 - 1945

Informasjonen nedenfor vedr. skip i Nortraships flåte er direkte avskrift av orginalkilden "Sjøforklaringer fra andre verdenskrig (1940 - 1945)". Informasjonen her er fra sjøforklaringer holdt under og rett etter krigen og kan derfor avvike noe fra den øvrige kvalitetssikrede informasjonen i Krigsseilerregisteret.

Dato
16. oktober 1941
Posisjon
ATlanterhavet, 65.10 N, 24.30 V
Årsak
Torpedert [av tysk ubåt]
Last
Tømmer
Reiserute
Sydney NS - Londonderry
Mannskapsliste
Komplett
Reddet
21
Fanget
0
Omkommet
0 [0]
Savnet
0
  • Referat

    Dato
    29. oktober 1941
    Administrator
    Konsul L. Offerdahl

    ...

    Appeared the vessel's master, Conrad Emil Rustad, and produced a report about the occurrence ...

    ...

    The captain referred to the report as his evidence and added that the "Rym" had a crew of 21 men (one man short) in which were included 2 machine gunners. Of the ship's papers, the Certificate of Nationality, the Tonnage Certificate and the Freeboard Certificate were saved. The deck log book was lost. All men on board were saved. At the time of the torpedoing the chief officer was on watch on the bridge together with the helmsman, A.B. Seaman Olaf Sætre, who was left behind at Londonderry, and the look-out man, jr. ordinary seaman Kerr. The captain, himself, was also on the bridge when the torpedoing occurred. It was moderate weather with rain showers and quite dark. All lights on board were screened. When the crew left the ship she had a heavy list and water was rising steadily.

    The Commanding Officer on H.M.S. "Veronica" asked the Captain if there was a chance of towing the steamer to land. To this the Captain replied that there might be a possibility if the weather continued moderate and if there had not existed a state of war. The Commanding Officer on the "Veronica", however, was of opinon that it would be too risky to make an attempt to save the ship and that another destroyer would be ordered to sink her. The Captain did not, himself, see the submarine, but saw the torpedo when about 2 1/2 fathoms from the ship. There was no opportunity to make use of the guns on board.

    ...

    The 1st witness (Arne Smith, chief officer) stated that he was acquainted with the Captain's report to which he referred as his evidence. The witness, who was on watch on the bridge when the torpedoing occurred, did not see anything of either U-boat or torpedo. When the witness saw the vessel last - on the day after the torpedoing - she had a heavy list, and the witness considered it as quite out of the question that there could be any possibility of getting her to land. The witness otherwise made statement in conformity with the captain.

    ...

    The 2nd witness stated that he was on watch in the engine room when the torpedoing occurred. The engine was working quite satisfactorily. The witness was by the dynamy engine when the torpedoing occurred. He at once ran up on deck, but went down again a little afterwards and stopped the engine. He went out into the stokehold in order to look for the fireman, but found that he had gone. When the witenss came up again the lifeboat had left. The witness remained on board together with the captain, 1 A.B. Seaman and 1 fireman the whole night, and they were taken on board the corvette at 9 o'clock in the morning. The witness had the engine room log book in a bag outside his cabin door. A sea, however, came over washing along the passage and carrying with it the bag so that this was lost.

    The captain's report was thereafter read out to the witness who had nothing to remark about it.

    ...