Maritime inquiry 1939 - 1945

The information below regarding ships in the Nortraship fleet is a direct transcript of the original source "Sjøforklaringer fra andre verdenskrig (1940 - 1945)". The informasjon is collected from maritime inquiries held during and right after the war. The information may differ from the other quality assured information in Krigsseilerregisteret.

Date
June 19, 1940
Location
Atlanterhavet, ca. 45.10 N 11.50 W
Cause
Torpedert [av tysk ubåt]
Cargo
Stål og stykkgods
Route
Gibraltar - Liverpool
Crew list
Komplett
Survived
38
Captured
0
Deceased
1 [1]
Missing
0
  • Abstract

    Date
    June 25, 1940
    Location
    Plymouth
    Administrator
    Visekonsul S. Carlile Davis

    ...

    Captain Hans Bjønnes appeared and declared ...

    The "Tudor" departed from Melbourne on the 15th March last with a cargo consisting of general goods bound for Marseilles, Lisbon and Liverpool. On sailing from Melbourne the said ship was in every respect in a wholly seaworthy manner. He produced the scrap log-book of the ship and an extract of the same concerning the material events relating to the loss of the ship and her cargo and also to the importunate loss of the 2nd Engineer of the said ship. ... He also produced a list of the survivors of the of the crew, ... The master referred to the contents of the extract of the logbook and furthermore declared that they left Gibraltar on the 13th June in convoy at 5.30 p.m. (B.S.T.) and so proceeded with British warships accompanying the convoy. That on the 19th day of June he was on the Bridge of the said ship when at 2.45 a.m. she was struck (when i latitude 45 gr 10 minutes Nort and longitude 11 gr 50 west) by a torpedo on the port side in the way of No 1 and No 2 hatches, a terrific explosion took place at once and the ship began to go down by the head that he at once gave orders for all the lifeboats to be manned and four lifeboats were put on the water and manned. That he went down from the Bridge to the amidshipsdeck and by then two lifeboats had left. A few minutes later the third lifeboat had left and he remained on deck until he saw that everyone of the crew was off the ship and then got into the last lifeboat. At that time the said vessel was so much down by the head that her stern was lifted and the propeller was out of the water. That just before the ship was struck by a torpedo he noticed in the moonlight a dark shape on the water less than a mile away on the port quarter. He thought it was a submarine and sent out a danger signal and altered the course of the said ship, directed the engines to be put at full speed, but at the same time a torpedo was seen glinding like silver stripe towards the ship. That nothing could have been done to avoid the torpedo. That they remained standing by the ship until 7 a.m. when suddenly he noticed that the ship started to go down very quickly. In about 30 seconds later she disappeared. That they then set sail and proceeded on a course to try to reach Spain which was about 180 miles in a South Easterly direction, from their position. That about 11 a.m. they sighted two British warships which proceeded towards them and he and 14 members of crew were taken onboard H.M.S. "Arabis" and landed at Plymouth on *Friday the 21th June at 4.00 p.m.

    That he desired to place on record sincere appreciation of the manner in which they were all treated by the officers and crew of the H.M.S. "Arabis" while they were onboard that ship.

    ...

    ... the First Witness, second Officer Odd Lea who deposed that he had kept the rough logbook and had written the entries in that logbook from which the extract produced was made. He further declared that he was on duty on the Bridge when at 2.43 a.m. on the 19th June he sighted a submarine showing just a part of its top above the water in the moonlight. Order were given to go full speed ahead and signals were given of the presence of the U.boat. The wheel was put hard to starboard, just a moment afterwards he saw a torpedo coming rapidly through the water. It struck the ship betewwen No 1 and No 2 hatches on the port side. It exploded and caused such damage that the said ship to sink as her foreport filled with water. That he went to the Chart Room and picked up the rough logbook and then went to a boat on the starboard side into which several members of the crew went. That he waited for sometime and at last the captain came along and got into the boat. That they then left the ship, that as they came aft they noticed one of the ship's boat caught in the propeller of the ship. It was out of the water owing to the ship being down by the head. In the boat they found Nils Pettersen, the third officer, he had been injured, and only half conscious. That they took him into their and then stood by until 7 a.m. when the ship's stern rose further out of the water, and she then sank. That ultimately they were picked up by H.M.S. "Arabis" and landed at Plymouth.

    ...

    The second witness the Engineer Edward Christopher Gasmann appeared and deposed that on the 19th June at 2.44 a.m. he was on duty in the Engine Room of the "Tudor" when he received by the telegraph an order to put the said ship at full spead ahead, that was done. Before that the said vessel had been going at slow and half speed. Thh at about a minute later he felt something strike the ship and immediately he heard an explosition.That he at once stopped the eninges, ordered two members of the crew who were in the Engine Room to go up. They did so and he followed them. That when he came on deck it was dark. All the electric lights in the ship below were alight. There were no ligths on deck, but he noticed that the bow of the ship was going down. That he went to get into No 2 lifeboat but found that it was not on the water, as the block was caught. That he jumped into the sea and was picked up by those in No 4 boat. That he subsequently saw No 2 boat on the water with three men in it. Later two of the men in No 4 boat went into No 2 boat, that they found several members of the crew in the sea, and picked them up until they had 20 men in it. Some of the men were transferred to No 2 boat. That all the boats stood by until the said ship went down at about 7 a.m. That they then set a course for the land and after sailing for sometime they sighted two British warships. That at 11.44 a.m. they were picked up hy H.M.S. "Calendula" and ultimately were landed at Plymouth on Saturday the 22nd June. That the officers and crew of H.M.S. "Calendula" looked after the survivors of the "Tudor" very well and he desired to record grateful thanks for the treatment they received.

    ...

    The Third Witness O. M. Tallaksen the Carpenter appeared and deposed that about 2.45 a.m. on the 19th June he was standing on the poop of the "Tudor" when he saw a torpedo coming towards the ship. It struck the ship on the port side and caused gtreat damage when it exploded. That he went first to No 4 lifeboat, but no one was in it so he crossed over to the starboard side and got into No 3 lifeboat. That he remember that the Third Officer Nils Pettersen and the 2nd Engineer were in that boat. When it left the ship's side the boat was carried towards the ship's stern and lifted by the sea against the propeller, which smashed the lifeboat. That Engineer Hansen was in the stern of the lifeboat when it struck the propeller. That he and other in the boat jumped into the sea, he never saw Hansen again. He though he was killed by striking the propeller and being thrown into the sea. That the other members of that boat dived into the sea were picked up by No 2 and No 4 lifeboat. That he himselves was not picked up until he had been in the water for over half an hour, and he was then picked up by No 2 lifeboat. That the ship sank about four hours later. That they were ultimately picked up by H.M.S. "Calendula" and brought to Plymouth where they were landed on the 22nd June.

    ...

    The Fourth Witness Wangberg appeared and deposed that he was at the wheel of the m/s "Tudor" on the 19th June when she was struck by a torpedo, that he did not see either the submarine or the torpedo. That shortly before the torpedo struck the ship he received an order from the captein to put the helm hard starboard. That he put the helm over accordingly, and the said ship had just gone over a little when a great explosition occurred and her bau went down immediately causing the stern to lift som much that the propeller was in the air. That he went to launch No 3 lifeboat but found that it was already launched. That he went and got into No 1 lifeboat and waited there some minutes until the captain came. By that time all the other lifeboats had left the ship. That after they left the ship they found the 3rd Mate in No 3 boat which was full of water caught in the propeller. He was crying out for help, he had been injured. That owing to the swell it was not safe to go too near the ship so they all called to Pettersen to jump into the sea, he do so and was duly picked up.

    ...

    The Fifth Witness Rasmussen appeared and deposed that on the 19th June inst. that when the ship was torpedoed he was keepintg a lookout on the forcastle head. That he did not see any submarine not did he see any torpedo until just before it struck the ship. That a terrific explisition occurred and as the bau of the ship began to go down he jumped into the sea. After swimming for 10 minutes he was picked up by No 4 lifeboat and ultimately brought by H.M.S. "Calendula" to Plymouth.

    ...